USCIS IMMIGRATION FILING FEES INCREASE EFFECTIVE APRIL 1

Feb 8, 2024 | Immigration Updates, Investor Visas

CONDITIONAL EB-5 PERMANENT RESIDENTS WHO FILE FORM I-829 REMOVAL OF PETITIONS BEFORE APRIL 1, 2024, CAN SAVE $5,775

By Joey Barnett

This final rule increasing the government filing fee is effective April 1, 2024. Any benefit request postmarked on or after this date must be accompanied by the new fees established by this final rule. https://public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2024-01427.pdf

Three things to know for EB-5 immigrant investors and Regional Centers:

  1. New I-829 Filing Fee is $9,525.    

The increase for Form I-829 petitions will be from $3,750 to $9,525. Avoid wasting another $5,775 if you file your removal of conditions before April 1, 2024, and during the 90-day filing window.

2. New I-526/I-526E Filing Fee is $11,160. 

The increase for Form I-526 (direct) and Form I-526E (regional center) petitions will increase from $3,675 to $11,160. Avoid wasting $7,485 by filing before April 1, 2024.

3. New I-956 Filing Fee is $47,695. 

The filing fee for Form I-956, Application for Regional Center Designation will increase from $17,795 to $47,695. Save $29,900 by filing for a new Regional Center Designation before April 1, 2024. To schedule a consultation with a WR Immigration attorney to discuss your EB-5 case, please schedule here!

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