President Trump’s New Travel Ban – Part 2: Update from Department of State

President Trump’s New Travel Ban – Part 2: Update from Department of State

Today, the U.S. Department of State (“DOS”) released a statement on President Trump’s proclamation titled “Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry into the United States by Terrorists or other Public-Safety Threats.”  DOS provided a helpful chart describing the various travel restrictions for nationals of each of the eight countries subject to the travel ban:

DOS also provided a list of exceptions from the travel ban that applies to nationals of all eight countries, such as:

  • Any national who was in the United States on the applicable effective date of the proclamation for that national, regardless of immigration status;
  • Any national who had a valid visa on the applicable effective date of the proclamation for that national;
  • Any national whose visa was marked revoked or marked canceled as a result of Executive Order 13769 who qualifies for a visa or other valid travel document under section 6(d) of the proclamation;
  • Any lawful permanent resident (LPR) of the United States;
  • Any national who is admitted to or paroled into the United States on or after the applicable effective date of the proclamation for that national;
  • Any applicant who has a document other than a visa, valid on the applicable effective date of the proclamation for that applicant or issued on any date thereafter, that permits him or her to travel to the United States and seek entry or admission, such as advance parole;
  • Any dual national of a country designated under the P.P. when traveling on a passport issued by a non-designated country;
  • Any applicant traveling on a diplomatic (A-1 or A-2) or diplomatic-type visa (of any classification), NATO-1 -6 visas, C-2 visa for travel to the United Nations, or G-1, G-2, G-3, or G-4 visa; except certain Venezuelan government officials and their family members traveling on a diplomatic-type B-1, B-2, or B1/B2 visas
  • Any applicant who has been granted asylum; admitted to the United States as a refugee; or has been granted withholding of removal, advance parole, or protection under the Convention Against Torture.

Please note that this information is subject to change. We will continue to update our blog as more information about the travel ban becomes available.

By | 2018-05-24T21:05:04+00:00 September 26th, 2017|Blog, Immigrant Visa, Non-Immigrant Visa|Comments Off on President Trump’s New Travel Ban – Part 2: Update from Department of State

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